VIBIN' WITH CHRISSIE (ZARTMAN) COURTNEY

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CHRISSIE COURTNEY

One of the best liberos in the collegiate game!!

QUICK FACTS ON CHRISSIE

 
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Played at Bishop Montgomery High School and was an Outside Hitter

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She was an All-American Libero at UCLA

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She is currently the Head Coach at Marymount California University

“I remember growing up watching Chrissie play at UCLA. She was ALL over the court. Relentless and so competitive! She may have been the smallest volleyball player in the gym but she played HUGE. I think the best part about Chrissie’s story is that she was a VERY successful volleyball player, at only 5’3’’. With that said, to all of you kiddos that think you are “too short” to play at a high level -- GET THAT OUT OF YOUR HEAD! Work hard & Compete. Don’t let anyone tell you that ‘you can’t’. We love that Chrissie is training at VIBE, it’s such a great opportunity to the kids in the area to learn from one of the best.”

-Nikki Jagd

Played on the AVP Tour & was nominated Rookie of the Year and had several Top 10 finishes

A closer look at the fierce, fast, and 5'3" AVP Pro, Chrissie Zartman

Volleyball is in her genes

Chrissie comes from the ultimate volleyball family…

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Chrissies Mom, Sharkie Zartman

Former USA National Volleyball Team Member, One of 25 All Time Greats at UCLA Volleyball, Jersey at UCLA was Retired, Five-time USA All American

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Chrissies Dad, Pat Zartman

Served as Assistant US National Team Coach in 1970,  Head Coach of the US National Team in 1974 and was Coach of the Year 1970 - 2001



Q&A with Chrissie:

What's your VIBE (describe yourself)?: I'm a volleyball coach who grew up in the South Bay. I went to elementary school at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Hermosa Beach, high school at Bishop Montgomery in Torrance, and college at UCLA. I love sharing my experiences with people and feel so fortunate to still be involved in a sport that I love so much. I have a great family and am so lucky to get to have them in my life.

Your favorite volleyball memory: Having the opportunity to grow up playing volleyball with my family and traveling the world to play the sport I love.

What brought you to VIBE? The opportunity to work with great people and help others have fun and be confident in what they are doing.

What is the best piece of advice you can give to an aspiring volleyball player? Work hard and have fun! Play every point as if it was your last and appreciate the fact that you are healthy and able to play a sport that you enjoy.

Fun fact about yourself: I don't like cheese (which people seem to think is weird.)

Extra Fun Fact: I played volleyball for VIBE Co-Owner Nikki Jagd’s  Mom (Kim Jagd) at UCLA. Small world!!!

Tell us more: I love Christmas movies on the Hallmark Channel. Okay, one more thing!!!!  In college, people in the airport always asked if I was the team manager because of my 5'3  height :)

VIBIN' WITH SARAH PAVAN

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GET TO KNOW VIBE TRAINER

SARAH PAVAN

VOLLEYBALL QUICK FACTS:

FIVB finishes this season:

  • 1st Place - Commmonwealth Games in Canada (April 2018)

  • 1st Place - FIVB 5-Star in China (April 2018)

  • 4th Place - FIVB 4-Star in Huntington Beach (May 2018)

Individual

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Sarah made Canada’s Indoor National Team at the age of 16

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  • Four-Time First Team All-American

  • 2006 AVCA National Player of the Year

  • 2007 Honda Broderick Cup Winner for Top NCAA Female Student-Athlete

  • 2012 CEV Champions League Best Attacker

  • Two-Time FIVB World Tour Best Blocker

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Team

  • 2006 NCAA National Champions

  • Two-time Brazilian Superliga Champions

  • 5th Place 2016 Olympic Games

Q & A WITH SARAH:

What’s is like playing club volleyball in Canada? Did you play club? Where?

Club volleyball has grown a lot in Canada, and now it is very similar to American club volleyball, but back when I played club it was really small. We had a tournament every month from October to April, and we mostly stayed in our province. My teams went to American tournaments every year, but most teams just stayed in Ontario to compete. I played in my hometown of Kitchener, Ontario for a club that was called the Waterloo Tigers. 

Back when I started, the youngest age group was 14U, and my parents finally let me play when I was 10. I was the youngest on the team by far, but as I got older, I continued to play up in the older age groups as well as with my own age. It helped me get better quickly.

 

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What was your favorite memory  from when you played at Univ of Nebraska? 

Hands down, my fondest memory from Nebraska is winning the 2006 National Championship. One of the big reasons I went to Nebraska was to win, and we had lost to Washington in the final the year before. It was absolutely heart-breaking, but being able to come back the next year and win with a team that, on paper, wasn’t supposed to be as good as the 2005 team, is something that I will remember forever. It was made extra special because the group of girls was so close, and we were able to win it in our home state in front of all of our fans.

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What are your hobbies off the court?

I am a HUGE nerd, and do a lot of nerdy stuff outside of volleyball. I love learning, so I am always taking one of two online classes in topics that interest me. Right now, I’m learning about herbalism and essential oils. I also love playing board games, doing crossword puzzles, and reading. I am a big foodie, and am always trying new restaurants or recipes, and I like getting out and being active, whether it be paddle boarding, hiking, bike riding, etc.

Random Fun fact...GO!

I was classically trained in piano through the Canadian Royal Conservatory of Music. I played for over 10 years before I went to college. 

Why do you love coaching volleyball?

There have been a lot of amazing people who have helped me become the athlete I am, and get to where I am today. I am extremely fortunate to live the life I do through volleyball, and if I can share my experience, or help someone else get better or realize their dreams, then that makes me so happy. I didn’t do this alone, and I love giving back to the community that gave me the life I have today. 

If Volleyball didn’t exist what sport do you think or would you want to play instead ?

TENNIS!!!!

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Favorite
Food - Pizza!!
Animal - Giraffe (and not just because I’m tall)
Vacation destination - Rio de Janeiro
Clothing brand - If I’m wearing workout clothes, which is 98% of the time, it’s Lululemon. I love shopping for casual clothes at Anthropologie.
Workout - Beach Volleyball/Paddleboarding

Tell us something about your wonderful hubby Adam!

I am honestly the luckiest girl in the world to have found Adam. We share so many interests (volleyball is one of them), and he is the most supportive husband ever. He is the kindest human I have ever met. Adam played volleyball at McMaster University in Canada, and was the stats man for the Canadian National Team for several years. He is currently the assistant coach for my beach team, and helps run the AVP Academy. He is a computer programmer, and loves coaching both beach and indoor.

College Recruiting Changes

BY KATIE CHARLES

Did you know there could be some changes in the college recruiting world? 

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So, the big talk amongst Division I college coaches for the last month has been the pending change in NCAA legislation surrounding early recruiting. During the NCAA Division I Council meetings, April 16-18th, there will be several new proposals up for vote that will have significant impact on how student-athletes and college coaches will interact in the future.

Currently, the recruiting rules for Division I restrict official (paid for) visits to senior year of high school, but allow students athletes to visit a campus unofficially at any point outside of NCAA mandated dead periods. Proposal No. 2017-111 would make a significant change to those rules. Now, student athletes would be able to take official visits paid for by the colleges beginning September 1 of the Junior year. This is meant to ease the burden of expenses for families to visit schools prior to committing and to level the recruitment playing field for all students. If it passes, this statute of the legislation is set to take effect August 1, 2018. Of the legislation that is up for vote, this is the most beneficial to student athletes and their families.

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However, on the flip side, Proposal No. 2017-112 would restrict any unofficial visits from occurring prior to September 1 of a student-athlete’s Junior year. That means, student-athletes would no longer be allowed to visit a school to meet with the coaches, have any athletics-specific contact while on campus, or any complimentary admissions to sporting events prior to Junior year.

It is also going to be restricting the college coaches ability to have any contact with athletes prior to Junior year. Right now, a student-athlete can do all of those things outside of NCAA mandated dead periods. The difficult part about this proposal is that, should it pass the Council vote, it will take effect on April 25th, likely affecting the Class of 2020 the most. This proposal is the most concerning for both student-athletes and college coaches.

 

The final piece of legislation up for vote will concern Camps and Recruiting. Coaches will no longer be allowed to speak to athletes about recruiting during camp. So, attending college camps with the intention of it being a recruiting opportunity for an athlete will no longer be the case. This will make having a good Recruiting Coordinator or a Club Director that really understands the legislation a vital part of your club volleyball experience!

If you have any questions about how this legislation could affect your recruiting process, reach out to me. I would be happy to help!

 

 

 

How to Fight a Cold

How to Fight a Cold

On a daily basis I am very conscious about what I am putting into my body, so when I get sick I am not a fan of cough syrups, antibiotics, or over-the-counter drugs. I take more of the natural holistic remedy route..I know so hippie!

IF YOU ARE FEELING LIKE YOU ARE ON THE VERGE OF CATCHING A COLD OR STRUGGLING TO KICK A LINGERING ONE CHECK OUT MY GO TO NATURAL ROUTINE:  

Athlete of the Month Spotlight - Kelli Barry

Athlete of the Month Spotlight - Kelli Barry

Not only is Kelli a crazy good volleyball player but she is one of the first ever VIBE Triber's! Kelli has been involved with VIBE from the very beginning--even before VIBE even existed!  Kelli was on my 13s team back in 2013 and I remember seeing Kelli at Tryouts--HOLY MOLY.!!!! This kid can play. She gets it. She is a natural! I love that Kelli comes in to VIBE to get her extra reps before big games, even if its just because she is superstitious! :) It has been so cool to have been able to see her grow as a player and a person over the last 5 years and now to be able to see what she accomplished in San Diego!!! Good Luck, Kel !

SETTERS- How to Run an Effective Offense

By NIKKI JAGD

 
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PUT UP A HITABLE BALL!!!

Trust me. I love the fancy stuff but if you aren’t putting up a CONSISTENT and HITABLE ball, you won’t win. Your hitters need to be given the best chance to get a kill and they can’t do that with a set thats too tight, wide or low. My tip for this is if your set isn't going to be PERFECT then be sure to always error your sets high, off & inside.

BEAT THE OPPOSING MIDDLE

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Your goal as a setter is to give your hitter a 1 on 1 with the block. There are three ways to give your hitters this opportunity, ONE….. Go against the flow of the pass. TWO…. Establish your middle hitter early in the game so that the other middle is always a little worried about them or run your middles as much as you can so you keep the opponents middle blocker disciplined. THREE…. Get the ball to your hitter as soon as you can by running a fast tempo offense in system.

KNOW YOUR HITTERS

What hitter responds well to a pressure situation? How do your hitters react after they make a mistake--Do you give the ball back to them because they are fired up and want to make up for it? Or give them some time to breathe it out, get back in their groove before you give them another ball? Know how they individually like their sets…. High & Tight because you have a 6’5 Outside hitting against a 5’7 blocker? Off the net but fast because you have a small outside and she wants to beat the block and not get trapped by the block?

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COMMUNICATE

Absolutely talk to your hitters… before the play, after the play.. even during the play. Keep them focused and engaged. Tell them that you are setting them the next ball  or that you will be there to cover them so they feel confident to swing away. Your hitters are your weapons. If they aren’t working, you won’t win. What’s more important than talking to your hitters? Talking to your passers. What can you do without a good pass? You can’t run an offense. Before the play, demand a good pass from them. During the play, let them know where you are “right here, right here!!” After the play, acknowledge their good passes, get them back in the game after a bad pass.

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

VIBE Tribe Tip - Being Stopped & Balanced on Defense

FROM TRAINER NATALIE HAGGLUND

Being stopped and balanced on defense as the hitter is swinging their arm. 

The goal here is to put your body in a good position by reading the hitter's line of approach. Then getting STOPPED and BALANCED so that you are able to move in any direction that the hitter might hit to. 

The key is to not take a "negative step" to the ball. Check out this drill run by VIBE Trainer Natalie Hagglund to eliminate those unnecessary steps. 

If you see the athlete moving before contact, throw the tennis ball in the opposite direction so it becomes evident that they were "guessing", leaning or moving before contact. 

Let us know what training tips and drills you would like next from the VIBE Tribe!

Comment below ↓↓↓

How to Properly Warm Up for Practices, Matches & Workouts

BY LEAH HINKEY

Above all else, the most important thing you can do before a workout, practice or game, is to warm up properly.

Why is it so important??

To help prevent injury!

Think of your muscles like rubber bands.
When you spend all day sitting at school, hunched over your desk, those rubber bands go almost completely unused. Then, you go to practice and immediately jump into hitting lines – those cold, unstretched rubber bands get pulled apart very quickly and will snap.

So, what about just a few quick static stretches before?

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Unfortunately, just doing static stretches can overextend muscles, robbing them of the power and strength necessary for your actual workout/movements needed to perform in practice...

For that reason, dynamic warm-ups are the way to go!

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By moving around and loosing up your muscles, you will keep yourself strong and injury free.

Dynamic warm-ups help activate your central nervous system and improve your blood circulation. Use the warm-up to get your muscles and joints ready for maximum flexibility, which allow you to perform movements on the court utilizing PROPER form to minimize the risk of injury.

When you step on the court for the first serve you want to be sweaty. Your body will be ready to start the game off at a high level, rather than needing a few rallies to get warm and in the rhythm.

You may not see the benefits of this now at a young age, but when you are in your 20’s playing professionally and have been training for over 10 years, trust me...your body will thank you for taking care of it.

It just takes 10 minutes to prime your muscles to help you perform at a high level.  

Test out this quick and easy warm-up routine you can do anywhere….

  • Before practice

  • At tournaments to prep for matches

  • Pre weight training or conditioning

 

Jump Rope 3 -5 Minutes

-Mix in single leg jumps, side to side, double unders

I use this lightweight, adjustable jump rope. You can find it on Amazon here.

20 body weight squats

10e leg spiderman lunges

-Plank position, lift your hips to step your right foot outside of your right hand, hold, back to plank and switch

10e leg hip up and overs

-Like you are stepping over a tall hurdle

10e leg swings forward/backward

10e leg swings crossbody

10 scap push ups

-Start in a high plank position, keep body in a straight line, tight core, glutes, and quads. Lower body slightly by pinching your shoulder blades together and push back up.

10 mini arm circles each direction

10 big arm circles each direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VIBIN' WITH KELLY REEVES

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GET TO KNOW TRAINER

Kelly Reeves

San Diego native, Kelly Reeves, is currently a top player on the AVP Tour and has been since she made her debut in 2016. She had such a stellar start to her professional career, playing in six tournaments, with top finishes of fifths on two occasions, earning her the Rookie of the Year title. Prior to becoming an AVP stud, she was an alternate for the indoor National Team in 2013. 

This UCLA grad was the first ever in school history for sand to be an AVCA Collegiate Sand Volleyball All- American in 2013. During her indoor career she helped lead UCLA to a National Championship title in 2011. So pretty much Kelly is a beast of an athlete with a crazy impressive volleyball history and bright future in her beach volleyball career. 

 UCLA Indoor Championship, 2011

UCLA Indoor Championship, 2011

 Beastin on Tour in 2017,  AVP Photograhy

Beastin on Tour in 2017, AVP Photograhy

Q & A with Kelly

If you could pick any sport other than Volleyball to be professional in, what would it be? 

Professional Surfer. 

Do you have a secret talent? 

Not sure if I have secret talent, but I’m pretty good at shooting hoops. Any time you want to play a game of HORSE or PIG, you better bring your A game! 

What do you plan to do after you are done playing beach volleyball?

I’d like to travel a little bit and explore the globe. I’d like to learn how to ski or snowboard. 

But mainly I would like to coach. Whether it is beach or indoor, volleyball is passion of mine and I love being in the “volley world.” Maybe a little announcing or commentating, but definitely want to stay involved in the volleyball community. 

What would your autobiography be called?

How to keep it gucci.

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What is your favorite meal?

My all time favorite meal is Burgundy Tri-Tip, otherwise known as the famous “Cardiff Crack.” It’s not just your average Tri-Tip, it’s marinated to perfection and is literally so good! (If you ever find yourself in San Diego, be sure to check out Seaside Market and pick some up!)

In addition to the Tri-tip, I like to pair that with a good green leafy salad, sweet potatoes, and to top it off, mom’s homemade pecan pie for dessert! 

 

 

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Fun Fact:

Kelly won the CBVA Girls 16 & Under Championship with VIBE Trainer, Natalie Hagglund in 2008.

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A few of Kelly's favorite things....

Coffee, pizza, the beach, Instagram, tropical house music, (Kygo is my JAM)

Am obsessed with NASA, love to journal, have taken up little bit of photography, and love any Rom-Com type movie.

Set New Year’s Resolutions to Impact Your Life As a Student Athlete

BY LEAH HINKEY

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We all joke about it: the plan to eat right and then you end up at IN-N-OUT with your friends; the gym membership that will eventually disappear; putting an end to procrastinating with school work but before you know it you are pulling an all nighter to finish that project you totally spaced.

As a high school student athlete, setting goals isn’t just a matter of listing out a ton of your loftiest dreams and then forgetting about them. The goals you set as New Year’s resolutions, if they are reasonable and manageable, can help you in the college recruiting process.

Awesome job if you have already set some goals for 2018! If you haven’t, no biggie!

Check out some of the ideas below to help make you a better fit for the college roster at your dream school.

Make sleep a priority

Making sleep an important priority and a part of your school-training balance will help you better manage your time, stress, and recovery.

Athletes need at least 8 - 9 hours for optimal functioning.

If you do not get enough quality sleep you will see a reduction in your

  • Physical performance

  • Mental and cognitive performance

  • Recovery time from injury

Just think about that for a sec the next time you can’t focus in big game or when your body feels sore all the time.  

Which leads into the next one...

Get things done on time

Focus on getting your homework, projects, and studying done so you have more time to train, get adequate sleep, and create some free time to spend with your friends.

Pulling all nighters is hurting your recovery and development as an athlete. And let's be honest, how much information are you retaining for a test when you are cramming at 2am the night before?

Here are some helpful tips to try:

Eliminate distractions - put your phone on do not disturb. Use the 45/15 rule. Silence your distractions during 45 minutes of productivity and then have 15 minutes of mindless breaktime to scroll through insta.

I know it sounds scary to remove yourself from the social world for a whole 45 minutes, but I promise your IG posts will continue to get likes and your snap streaks won’t disappear. Give it a try...I dare you.

Make a smart to-do list -  include only the items that you’re avoiding, not the ones you know you’ll do anyway. Then set deadlines.

Make steady progress, every day

Set a goal to make yourself 1% better every day.

It can take a long period of time to improve a certain skill or increase your vertical, instead of sitting back and feeling like you are watching paint dry, set mini goals to keep yourself on track. These small daily or weekly goals will give you something to celebrate more often and keep you on the road to reaching that big goal that seems so far out of reach.

Be a better teammate and person

Student-athletes are more than just students, and more than just athletes. You are a leader: on the court, in the classroom, and in the community.

College coaches are looking beyond your physical ability and trying to figure out who are you as a person. They want to know what it will be like to have you as a member of their roster, how you will interact with the other players, and the coaches.

Some things to think about:

  • How can you develop your sportsmanship, every practice and every match?

  • How can you be more of an ideal student-athlete on your social profiles?

  • How do your extracurricular activities show that you care about giving back to your community?

Now that you have some ideas, grab a notebook and really think about your goals and what you would like to improve and accomplish this year!

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Once you have your resolutions mapped out, here are some tips to help you stay on track:

Start small

Make resolutions that you think you can keep. If you would like to eat healthier, try replacing dessert with something else you enjoy, instead of seeing your diet as a form of punishment.

Change one behavior at a time

Unhealthy behaviors develop over time. So, replacing unhealthy behaviors with healthy ones requires time. Don’t get overwhelmed and think that you have to change everything in your life all at once. Instead, work toward improving one thing at a time.

Talk about it

Share your goals with a teammate or friend. Having someone to share your struggles and successes with makes your journey towards your goals that much easier and less intimidating.

Don’t beat yourself up

Perfection is an unattainable goal.  It isn’t going to be perfect.  Remember that minor setbacks will happen and are completely normal and OK. Everyone has ups and downs, decide to recover from your missteps and get back on track.

Best of luck on reaching your goals and HAPPY 2018!!!

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How to stay fit over Christmas Break

By Leah Hinkey

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Prep for the first tourney of the New Year while enjoying the Holiday Break!

The holidays are my favorite time of year. Getting to travel, spending time with friends and family, making christmas cookies while watching Elf, and of course my fav- lots of pumpkin pie and hot choco!!

But is it possible to find some balance with all the delicious treats and family feasts? Wouldn’t it be nice to not feel like your going to puke all over the court during a coach on one after cramming 17 cookies in your mouth in one day over break? Or to be motivated enough to get out of your onesie and leave the fireplace to knock out a light 30 min workout?

It’s possible - the secret is everything in moderation. Try your hardest to pass on the second scoop of pumpkin pie (sounds impossible, I know) or skip out on the 2nd serving of sweet potato casserole.

Plan some fun, active activities to do with your friends and family. Christmas break is all about giving your body some much needed R&R, so mix it up and keep it light... your activities don’t have to be anything strenuous, just get your blood flowing.

  • Go for a light beach jog
  • Run up some snowy hills while sledding
  • Test out a moderate yoga class- I know yoga sounds scary but who knows you might end up liking it or you’ll hate it, but regardless you will walk out of the class feeling better.

If you do find a little extra motivation but still want to stay in your onesie, test out this at home (onesie friendly) workout:

No weights needed, grab a 10 lbs (+) weight if you are feeling extra motivated

Warm Up:

Jump Rope

  • Normal pace jump, 30 seconds

  • Right foot only, 30 seconds

  • Left foot only, 30 seconds

  • Double right, double left, 30 seconds

  • Fast as you can go, 30 seconds

Dynamic Stretches

  • Lunge w/ twist

  • Inch worm w/ push up

  • Walking pigeon

  • Side to side lunge

A. 4 x 8

Good Mornings

Lateral Lunge w/ press (10 lbs weight or med ball)

Kayak w/ overhead press (10 lbs weight or med ball)


B. 4 x 6

Squats

Squat jumps

30 sec plank hold

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C. Foam Roll

Quads

IT Bands

Glutes

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The club season starts quicker than we are ever prepared for after the holidays. Make sure to prep your body over break so you can start 2018 off with a bang and avoid a season opening injury!

Happy “activite” Holiday Break!

 

 

 

 

AVP Academy LA powered by VIBE Volleyball Lab

We are stoked to announce our partnership with the AVP Academy LA!

AVP Academy LA & VIBE Volleyball Lab are joining forces to create the total package for volleyball players in the South Bay Area.  We will be combining our Indoor private training methodology and bringing it to the beach!

 
 

We offer our athletes everything from private training, team training, strength and conditioning, sports nutrition, sports psychology, college recruiting & more!

Most importantly we will be utilizing the same training components and ideals that AVP Players, Coaches & Olympians are using that have gotten them to where they are today!

Fun Facts:

  • We are a year round Pipeline to high-school, collegiate and ultimately the AVP tour.

  • Offering programs for JUNIORS, Boys and Girls,  Ages 8-18  and ADULTS, Boys and Girls, Ages 18 and up.

  • The JUNIOR programs focus on preparing athletes for high school and collegiate play, as well as, tournament play.  

  • The ADULT programs focus on preparing the adult athletes to compete at the professional and international level.  

  • The AVPA has a very experienced and passionate staff led by Scott Davenport, who coached the Canadian Women’s Team in the 2016 Olympics and coaches top AVP teams.

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The AVPA has a very experienced and passionate staff led by Scott Davenport, who coached the Canadian Women’s Team in the 2016 Olympics and coaches top AVP teams.

Trainers:

Adam Schultz, Jenn Snyder, Chris Flood, Emily Stockman, Margaret Ray, Kyle Hausheer

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Mark your calendars - you are invited to our AVPA Kick Off Event!!


JANUARY 6th Workshop

WHERE: DOCKWEILER BEACH

WHEN: 9:30am-11:00am

COST: FREE! Just sign up online!

WHAT TO EXPECT?  

You will get to meet the Head Coach of AVPA-LA, Scott Davenport, and all of our wonderful trainers!!!  We will divide athletes by age group & skill level, boys & girls and run you through a few of our favorite drills for 30-45 minutes, play some games and then do a Q&A to finish up!

See you on the beach!!
 

 

 

 

 

VIBIN' WITH MATT THOBE

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Get to know 

 

 

MATT THOBE

Matt played at UCSB and after he graduated he went on to play professionally in Europe for five years. He is currently a head coach at Sunshine Volleyball Club. 

Did you know??

  • Matt’s middle name is Minter and most friends call him by his last name, Thobe (Pronounced Toby).

  • He wore glasses/contacts from 7 years old all the way until he was 22 years old when he got Lasik eye surgery.

  • As a junior and senior at UCSB, Matt received the award for highest GPA on his team.

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Matt’s Volleyball Quick Facts

  • He played at Loyola High School as a middle blocker where he and his team won two CIF Division 1 Championships.

  • Matt went on to play middle blocker at UC Santa Barbara where he earned his Bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies.

  • He also played professionally in Austria and Norway. In Tomsø, Norway the sun never rises in December/January and never sets in June/July.

 

Matt’s Fun Facts!

  • Pet names: Missy, Fred, Frisky, Gus, and Maverick

  • Bucket list: Spend a summer sailing around the islands in the Mediterranean

  • Ice Cream Flavor: World Class Chocolate from Baskin Robbins

  • Food fact: He didn’t eat guacamole for 20 years and now loves it!

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VIBE Tribe Tip - The Natural Break Passing Technique

FROM Trainer CAM GREEN

The purpose of the natural break passing technique is simple.  The idea is to create as much flat surface area as possible facing your target when contacting the ball.  

When we hold our arms together the way we have our whole volleyball lives, it leaves the long narrow bones (the radius) on top of our platform contacting the ball.  The problem with that is that there is no room for error.  If we don't contact the ball perfectly...it's shank city.  If you're a passer like me, you probably know that all too well.  If it doesn't contact those bones perfectly, that ball is in the stands somewhere.

So, the main idea of the natural break, is to get those narrow bones out of the way as we finish our pass.  The way we do this is by rotating our thumbs outward right as you contact the ball so that you leave the flat inside part of your forearms facing your target.  It's ok at this point if your arms even separate a little. This creates as much flat surface area as possible on which to contact the ball.   The trick is, however, not to open your platform too early.  If you open your arms before you contact the ball your platform will be unstable and it will be difficult to get the ball to your target.  

 
 

If you are a player or a coach I know this sounds crazy.  I'm a former player and a coach of over 20 years and believe me...I thought it was crazy too.  Then I tried it and watched it work with the college team I was coaching.  In my opinion...it's a game changer.  Not only does it help eliminate shanking balls, it also helps cushion your pass on those really tough serves.  

So I encourage you to think outside the box a little.  It's worth a shot and putting in some time.  I don't think it's for everyone and I don't make all of my players do it but I do teach it to all of them.  In fact one of the outside hitters on my girls team went from passing a 1.4 (and coming out in the back row) to a 2.3 and never coming out last season.  

If you can pass well you're going to be on the court.  So give it a try...you just might love it.

Active rest day vs full off day

BY LEAH HINKEY

Active rest day vs full off day:

How do you avoid overtraining? This is a very common question parents and players ask me at VIBE. With the non-stop practice and tournament schedule athletes have during the long club season it is tough to not feel like you are overdoing it. Be sure to add in rest days to recover faster and prevent injuries. Training too often will limit your volleyball strength gains and undermine your recovery efforts. Scheduling weekly active rest days will help maintain a balance in your training.

What should a recovery day look like? For a rest day, you probably feel like you should sit at home while binge watching Netflix and not moving from the couch. Although this sounds like the perfect excuse to rewatch season 1 and 2 of Stranger Things, unfortunately, doing nothing won’t help your body recover. The only time I would recommend taking a full day off with no activity and couch surfing is if you are feeling absolutely fatigued and mentally burnt out. All other rest days should be ACTIVE, nothing strenuous, but something light enough to get your blood flowing. Movement will help the body heal!

 
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Don’t worry, you can still get your Netflix on after you have incorporated something fun and active into your day.

Ideas for active rest:

  • Mobilize with lacrosse balls or foam roller
  • Take an easy yoga class
  • Go for a light beach jog, hop in a pool for a quick swim, or an easy bike ride
  • Resistance band exercises
  • Stretch it out!
 
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The goal is to get proper circulation to help speed up your recovery process.

We have active rest classes at VIBE. Core & Stretch on Wednesday nights, Plyo & Mobility Sunday afternoons. 

Don’t skip out on rest - if you can work in active rest days, it will be a game changer!

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Don't skip breakfast!

BY LEAH HINKEY

Breakfast is too important to be skipped, this advice is probably engraved into your skull. Most people feel too rushed in the morning after hitting their snooze button a few too many times, but eating a healthy breakfast is absolutely essential to having a productive day. It helps maintain blood sugar levels, revs up your metabolism, and produces adequate energy for athletic performance.

Breakfast smoothies are a good way to get a quick, healthy meal. Smoothies are easy, help you eat those veggies you don’t like, usually the healthiest choice, keeps you satiated, and they are packed with nutrients. Hitting each of these categories is like ingesting a multivitamin, except it keeps you full and energized.

Here are a couple of my favorite smoothies. Give ‘em a try!

 

Actually Yummy Green Smoothie:

INGREDIENTS

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  • 1 1/2 cups coconut water

  • 1/2 cup coconut milk

  • 2 TBS ground flax seed

  • Juice of one small lemon

  • 1/2 apple OR 1 pear

  • 1/2 orange

  • 3 stalks of celery

  • 4 large kale leaves (ribs removed)

  • 1 large handful of spinach

  • 1 scoop protein powder

  • Few ice cubs

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Add all ingredients to the blender. Blend until smooth. 

Notes

Makes 4 3/4 cups or 38 oz.

Can store in refrigerator in an airtight container for up to two days.

**Why coconut water and milk? It takes away a touch of the rich flavors of the greens (which helps it be more delicious). It also adds a little creaminess and coconut water is packed with hydrating electrolytes.

Chocolate, banana, peanut butter shake

INGREDIENTS

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  • 1 cup almond milk

  • 1 TBS creamy peanut butter

  • 1 ripe banana can be frozen, broken into large chunks

  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon

  • 1 scoop protein powder

  • 1 TBS unsweetened cocoa powder

  • 5-10 ice cubes depending on how thick you like it

  • optional: 1 tsp. honey

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Add all ingredients in blender

  2. Blend until smooth.

  3. If too thick, add more milk. If too thin, add some more ice.

How to get into volleyball as a beginner

BY LEAH HINKEY

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When I was 10 years old, my parents took me to middle school volleyball tryouts.  I had never touched a volleyball or had any idea what the sport was even about.  I threw a fit! I didn’t want to go and told them I hated volleyball. It’s funny listening to my parents tell that story then looking at my life 20 years later.  From that day on, volleyball has been the biggest part of my life.

It’s scary to start a brand new sport at any age - you don’t want to be the worse one, you might not have any friends there, and maybe the coach seems super scary.  But once we can get over the initial resistance of trying something new, it can open up some pretty amazing opportunities.  


Where to start at a young age is one of the biggest questions we get here at VIBE. Some parents are panicked that it is too late for their 12 or 13 year old to start because all of their friends started when they were 9 or 10. Trust me, it is never too late to get into the game, you just need to know what options you have and pick what is best for your athlete.

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Where to start:

9-10 yrs old - check out a beginner clinic. Keep this fun, it doesn’t have to be super intense or serious. Let your child learn to love the game and have fun playing while developing the fundamentals. If they don’t love it at first, keep them in clinics and skip out on signing up for a long club season with 2-3 practices a week and travel tourneys. Maybe they love it and want more? Look for a beginner team that practices once a week with a few local tourneys. You want to avoid jumping in too deep when they are young to avoid burn out.

10-12 yrs old - get going with some club clinics. If they want to get serious about trying out for a club but don’t feel ready, invest in some one-on-one or small group technical training. Learning the fundamentals at a young age will help kids avoid developing bad habits that will later on be harder to break.

What to wear:

  • Knee pads

  • Spandex/shorts

  • Court shoes - avoid converse or slip on vans 

Beginner Clinics at VIBE:

VIBE BABES - Girls ages 12 and under  - Mondays 5:30pm

VIBE GROMS- Boys ages 12 and under - Mondays 6:30pm & Saturdays 1:30pm

 

 

VIBIN' WITH CAM GREEN

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GET TO KNOW TRAINER

CAM GREEN

 

Cam is currently a director at the Southern California Volleyball Club. He has been a head coach for the boys and girls teams for the past 9 seasons. He was the Boys Varsity Head Coach at Mira Costa for 10 seasons and coached the team to win 2 CIF Championships. Cam went on to coach collegiately and made 3 Final Four appearances with the USC Mens Team and 2 Final Four appearances with the Long Beach State Mens Team.  

Did you know??

Cam is a member of a band called The Suicide Doors where he plays percussion (bongos, congas, and the cajon). His band consists of 2 DJs and Cam.

Cam is a self taught musician and has played with this band for 4 years.

He can also play the didgeridoo, which is a native Australian instrument created 1500 years ago.

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Cam's Fun Facts!

  • Dogs’ names: Chip and Dale

  • Bucket list: Sky dive

  • Ice Cream Flavor: Mint Chocolate Chip

  • Food fact: He is a pescatarian.

 

 

Cam’s Volleyball Quick Facts

  • He played volleyball at Mira Costa High School where he earned Ocean League MVP and First Team CIF honors.

  • He went on to play at Cal State Northridge as an outside hitter. They made it to the 1993 National Championship Finals.

  • Cam has coached club and high school volleyball since 1994 and has coached AVP greats such as Nancy Mason, Jen Boss, Rachel Wacholder, Tyra Turner, Elaine Youngs, Kerri Walsh, and Misty May.

 Playing against Todd Rodgers in a CBVA - 1995

Playing against Todd Rodgers in a CBVA - 1995

 Mira Costa Volleyball Team Sophomore Season 1990 

Mira Costa Volleyball Team Sophomore Season 1990 

He is currently coaching the Bearded Brothers, Riley and Madison McKibbin on the AVP Beach Tour. Come watch him in action this Friday through Sunday at the Manhattan Beach AVP Open!

If you are looking to improve your passing, setting, or hitting technique, book your indoor private or semi private training sessions with Coach Cam.

 University of Texas Womens Head Coach, Jerritt Elliott with Cam at VIBE

University of Texas Womens Head Coach, Jerritt Elliott with Cam at VIBE

 Prepping Madison and Riley McKibbin for MBO AVP

Prepping Madison and Riley McKibbin for MBO AVP

 VIBE Owners celebrating with Cam after Long Beach State won the MPSF Finals

VIBE Owners celebrating with Cam after Long Beach State won the MPSF Finals

How to Nutritionally Compete at JO's

By Krista Atzinger

JO’s is a grueling four days packed with volleyball during which each team member needs to be in the best-possible physical shape. Paying special attention to nutrition will help decrease soreness, injury, and will ultimately lead to a player’s peak performance. The nutrient timing is especially important due to the high levels of competition and will provide nourishment essential to sustaining your energy levels.  

Here is the breakdown…

Two days before the match… HYDRATE. Make sure you are getting plenty of liquids two days leading up to the tournament. You should be consuming more water and less soda and juice. Soda and juice can dehydrate you more, leading to your muscles looking like beef jerky. If you are not hydrated these beef jerky muscles and ligaments make you more susceptible to injury, which you are obviously trying to avoid. A good rule of thumb is to make sure your urine is clear or light yellow. The darker the yellow the more dehydrated you are.

The night before the first day… carbs, protein, and water are KEY. You need enough carbs in your body to be stored as energy. This needs to be balanced by a protein source, so pasta with chicken or meatballs and tomato sauce is a good go-to. Try to avoid alfredo or white sauce because it is high in fat, which takes longer to digest, resulting in stomach discomfort and lethargy.

The first day... be sure to wake up at least 2 hours before you play so it will give your body time to eat breakfast and digest before you hit the court. A complex carb is the best option before a long day of playing. This includes oatmeal, bagels, pastas, etc. This can be paired with a piece of fruit like a banana, a good source of potassium which helps prevent cramping.

During play… Bring a Gatorade, or PowerAde because your body’s energy storage will need to be refueled. You will need more gas for the tank, and liquid carbohydrates and electrolytes are the best way to refuel. After one hour of exercise, our storage needs to be replenished. 

Break… refill the tank with an actual food substance. This food substance should be a combination of carbs, protein, and water. It should also be low in fat. Therefore, avoid fried foods and fatty foods like pizza, because these foods will decrease performance. Some good options are a turkey/ham sandwich, a wrap, and a grilled chicken sandwich with a side of fruit or a vegetable cup. Avoid having salads because it takes your body a long time to digest and they aren’t an appropriate source of energy for performance.

After you play… the recovery is the most important part of the process. To effectively help your body recover, protein intake it the most important. Make sure your post-play meal is highest in protein with a balance of carbs and is consumed within 30 minutes post competition. I highly recommend bringing a protein bar or drink that you can have on the go as soon as you get done playing. This will help activate your body’s recovery process. If injured, pineapple is a good fruit source to reduce inflammation in the body and help prevent future inflammation.

When in doubt, always bring snacks with you to help replenish your body.

Proper nutrient intake will optimize your performance and can help lead you and your team to a JO championship. Fuel strong!

Krista will be hosting a sport nutrition seminar at VIBE on July 24th at 7:30pm!

Krista is our in house nutritionist - if you have questions or would like to set up a consultaion please contact us.